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Stuff that doesn't fit well in other threads.

Schrute Farm

TNTeenager
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There are only about 25 blimps left in the world.

"At the start of the 20th century, before the Wright Brothers finally got their famous Flyer off the ground in 1903, airships were seen as the future of human flight. The category includes a variety of dirigibles, such as zeppelins (which have a rigid structure) and blimps (which completely collapse when deflated). German zeppelins performed bombing runs in World War I, but the 1937 Hindenburg disaster — in which the Hindenburg zeppelin caught fire in New Jersey while attempting to moor, killing 36 — spelled the end of airships as commercial vehicles. While blimps found limited use during World War II, after the war, airships mostly transformed into floating advertisements."
I just saw on the PGA over the weekend that Goodyear still has 4 blimps in use. I'm already tired of some who abuse the drone in real estate marketing and giving a false view.

I for one appreciate you posting interesting stuff that isn't centered on politics. This site would grow if there was more of these, Thanks!
 

lostcreekranch

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I just saw on the PGA over the weekend that Goodyear still has 4 blimps in use. I'm already tired of some who abuse the drone in real estate marketing and giving a false view.

I for one appreciate you posting interesting stuff that isn't centered on politics. This site would grow if there was more of these, Thanks!
My pleasure ...

The fact that this stuff "troubles"some .. is concerning, to say the least.
 

Schrute Farm

TNTeenager
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This is a thread where we could come together and enjoy non political subjects but the tds runs too deep in most.
 

lostcreekranch

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April 21, 1836

Texas militia routs Mexicans in the Battle of San Jacinto

During the Texan War for Independence, the Texas militia under Sam Houston launches a surprise attack against the forces of Mexican General Santa Anna along the San Jacinto River. The Mexicans were thoroughly defeated, and hundreds were taken prisoner, including General Santa Anna himself.

After gaining independence from Spain in the 1820s, Mexico welcomed foreign settlers to sparsely populated Texas, and a large group of Americans led by Stephen F. Austin settled along the Brazos River. The Americans soon outnumbered the resident Mexicans, and by the 1830s attempts by the Mexican government to regulate these semi-autonomous American communities led to rebellion. In March 1836, in the midst of armed conflict with the Mexican government, Texas declared its independence from Mexico.

The Texas volunteers initially suffered defeat against the forces of Santa Anna–Sam Houston’s troops were forced into an eastward retreat, and the Alamo fell. However, in late April, Houston’s army surprised a Mexican force at San Jacinto, and Santa Anna was captured, bringing an end to Mexico’s effort to subdue Texas. In exchange for his freedom, Santa Anna recognized Texas’s independence; although the treaty was later abrogated and tensions built up along the Texas-Mexico border.

The citizens of the so-called Lone Star Republic elected Sam Houston as president and endorsed the entrance of Texas into the United States. However, the likelihood of Texas joining the Union as a slave state delayed any formal action by the U.S. Congress for more than a decade. Finally, in 1845, President John Tyler orchestrated a compromise in which Texas would join the United States as a slave state. On December 29, 1845, Texas entered the United States as the 28th state, broadening the irrepressible differences in the U.S. over the issue of slavery and igniting the Mexican-American War.
 

lostcreekranch

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"James Smithson, the man behind the Smithsonian Institute, never visited the U.S.

Born in France and raised in England, chemist James Smithson (1765–1829) was well-traveled, spending significant chapters of his life in Switzerland, Germany, and Italy. According to his will, he also gave much thought to transatlantic affairs in America, a destination that eluded him during his lifetime. He inherited a substantial sum from his mother (although not from his father, the Duke of Northumberland, because he’d been born out of wedlock), which he invested in emerging technologies such as canals and steam engines.

Smithson never married or had children of his own, and when he died, his will bequeathed his riches to his nephew, Henry James Hungerford — with an unusual clause. If Hungerford died without legitimate or illegitimate heirs, Smithson’s estate would be set aside for the United States “to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.” Hungerford only outlived his uncle by six years, and died without having children. Hypotheses abound concerning Smithson’s motives: Perhaps he wanted to denounce classist England, advocate for democracy, or simply create more charitable organizations grounded in a shared love of learning and science. After Congressional debate about whether the then-hypothetical Smithsonian would impinge states’ rights (among other concerns), in 1846 the Senate passed an act establishing what would become the world’s largest museum and research complex, which President James K. Polk duly signed into law. Today, the vast majority of the Smithsonian’s museums — such as the National Museum of Natural History and the National Museum of American History — are still located in the nation’s capital, and admission to these facilities is free."
 

lostcreekranch

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The First Earth Day

April 22, 1970

Today marks the 52nd annual celebration of Earth Day, a holiday that, since 1970, has raised awareness for environmental conservation efforts around the world. The holiday was the brainchild of U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, who was inspired to spearhead an environmental initiative after witnessing an 800-mile slick of spilled oil off the coast of Santa Barbara, California, in 1969. With the help of activist Denis Hayes, Nelson introduced the concept for the very first Earth Day, which was initially proposed as a nationwide “teach-in” intended to educate citizens across the country on environmentalism, preservation, and conservation.

On this day in 1970, more than 20 million Americans participated in peaceful demonstrations for environmental reform, making the inaugural Earth Day the largest single-day protest in human history. The turnout and interest in the event were influential in getting key environmental legislation passed throughout the next decade, including the Clean Air Act of 1970 and the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Nelson even went on to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his contribution to the environmental movement. Since the first celebration, Earth Day has evolved into an international phenomenon observed in 192 countries.
 

flyerdan

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I remember that first Earth Day, it was fairly newsworthy in our podunk little 2 room school in Moyie Springs Idaho where I was doing sixth grade at the time.
In all honesty, with rivers catching fire and very often seeing a pile of cigarette butts from a dumped ashtray when you opened a car door in a parking space, we'd become rather cavalier with treating the place like a sty. There is a happy medium between just not being a c**t and acting responsibly to what the lunatics are spouting now though.
 

Molalla1

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I remember that first Earth Day, it was fairly newsworthy in our podunk little 2 room school in Moyie Springs Idaho where I was doing sixth grade at the time.
In all honesty, with rivers catching fire and very often seeing a pile of cigarette butts from a dumped ashtray when you opened a car door in a parking space, we'd become rather cavalier with treating the place like a sty. There is a happy medium between just not being a c**t and acting responsibly to what the lunatics are spouting now though.
I just got home after 3 tours . . .
 

lostcreekranch

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A Library of Congress

April 24, 1800

"The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. is now the largest library in the world, but it began as a humble collection established on this day in 1800 by President John Adams. America's second President approved $5,000 (or about $112,000 today) to establish a collection of books “necessary for the use of Congress.” When a fire destroyed the library during the War of 1812, Congress replenished the stock by purchasing the entire 6,487-volume private collection of founding father Thomas Jefferson, a voracious reader who bought many of the volumes while serving as a diplomat in France.

Unfortunately, tragedy struck again in 1851, when a chimney fire reduced the library to a fraction of its size. Rising from the ashes yet again, the Library of Congress has since transformed its mission from being a tool for lawmakers to preserving every published work in the U.S. — including books, maps, photographs, music, and more. Today, the institution stretches across three separate buildings and currently holds some 170 million items, with an estimated 10,000 items added every day."
 

lostcreekranch

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"First Computer Mouse

April 27, 1981

The desktop computer and the mouse have long been inextricably linked, but in the 1970s and early ‘80s, using a computer was a strictly keyboard-only affair. That is until April 27, 1981, when the Xerox Corporation released the Star Information System, which came with a novel accessory with a curious name: the “mouse.” Unfortunately, very few people used the first mouse, because the Star cost a whopping $16,500 (about $48,000 today). Luckily, the fledgling computer company Apple took notice, and manufactured a much cheaper mouse for its Lisa computer in 1983. When the mouse migrated to the Macintosh a year later, it became the go-to method for navigating the digital world.

Although the Star computer was the first machine sold with a mouse, Xerox didn’t invent the accessory. That accolade belongs to engineer Douglas Engelbart, who created the “X-Y position indicator for a display system” in 1964. From there, the indicator bounced around various labs until it landed at Xerox, along with its familiar rodentine branding (based on its shape). Today, touch-based displays and trackpads have largely replaced the mouse, but the small accessory has made a big impact on computer history nonetheless."
 
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